NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat

Galley Cat will be offering great tips for writing your novel every day this month. Check out the day’s post and the archive.

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat.

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From The Write Practice Blog, Advice on Creating Good Bad Guys

The most important character in your story is the villain. If you find that your story is lacking something, you probably don’t have to look any further than the opposition. If your hero doesn’t have much to overcome, he can’t be much of a hero. The greater the evil he faces, the greater your protagonist will be. Even in stories of man against nature, it can’t just be any storm, it has to be the Perfect Storm. See what I mean? Click below for some great ways to make your opposition more effective–and more original.

50 Shades of Villain: How to Characterize Without Cliché.

There Can Be Only One…Main Character, That Is

About main characters. Screenwriters know about story structure. It is a good idea to listen to them about this. Of course, there are always exceptions, but if you think your book has more than one main character, this post is worth reading.

Let’s Schmooze – Doug Eboch on Screenwriting: There Can Be Only One…Main Character, That Is.

Sidekicks: Why Stories Need Them

If you think about your favorite stories. you will probably notice that the hero or heroine has friends. Where would Don Quixote have been without Sancho Panza, or Dorothy without her three adorable companions? Here’s a great article about sidekicks .

How to Kick Your Story Up a Notch With a Sidekick.

Literature’s Greatest Closing Paragraphs – Entertainment – ShortList Magazine

I’m getting ready to guide a novel revision group. Beginnings and endings hold keys to the tone, character, setting, and, most important, the emotional impact of a story. Here’s a fascinating collection of great endings.

Literature’s Greatest Closing Paragraphs – Entertainment – ShortList Magazine.