FIRST FIVE FRENZY with Amy Boggs of The Donald Maass Literary Agency | chasingthecrazies

Here’s an interview with a top literary agent about the first five pages of your novel. Amy Boggs is currently open to queries. See her preferences on the Donald Maass Literary Agency site. (Also, be sure to read The Fire in Fiction by Donald Maass. It’s amazing!)

FIRST FIVE FRENZY with Amy Boggs of The Donald Maass Literary Agency | chasingthecrazies.

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7 Deadly Sins of Prologues–Great Novel Beginnings Part 2 | Kristen Lamb’s Blog

If you have started your book with a prologue, here is something you should read from Kristen Lamb. Her entire blog, by the way, is fantastic!

7 Deadly Sins of Prologues–Great Novel Beginnings Part 2 | Kristen Lamb’s Blog.

Prologue in Fiction | The Editor’s Blog

From an editor, here’s a well-thought-out post on the pros and cons of prologues from a contemporary point of view. It starts with the pros. which, if you have used one, you already know. Keep reading. You may need yours, but you do need to know why they are less common in contemporary fiction than in works written 30, 40, 0r 50 years ago.

Prologue in Fiction | The Editor’s Blog.

Fantasy Elements in Realistic Novels

I am writing a contemporary middle grade fantasy that includes many very realistic elements, including a real-world contemporary problem that is resolved in the end. The following blog post addresses a different sort of fantasy/reality mix.

Take a look at this inspiring and practical advice by clicking on the link below.

4 Techniques To Mix Fantasy With Realism.

Redefining Characters from Fairy Tales for Today’s Children

Find out about the place of archetypal  characters in contemporary stories for children in this brief, but informative post.

Simon Rose – Author Writer Presenter www.simon-rose.com: Magic in Stories for Children: Part Two – Characters from Fairy Tales.

Check Out This Goldmine for Story Patterns and Ideas

If you write fantasy or books for children, here’s a treasure trove of information. It lists the categories of folktales. You can plug the descriptions into Google and find examples in a wink.

Aarne–Thompson classification system – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Follow Agent Vickie Motter’s Excellent Blog

If you are interested in finding an agent, first realize that the field is highly competitive and it may take a while.

In 2012 I attended a number of writer’s conferences and focused on the presentations of agents. I haven’t queried any of them yet, because my current novel wasn’t quite ready, but I gathered information, and even read for one in a session at Pike’s Peak. Pitch sessions, one-on-one critiques and group readings are all good ways to meet agents at conferences. So are casual conversations at parties and even meals at those big round tables.

You don’t have to attend a conference to find out more about an agent that interests you, though. More and more of the ones who are interested in finding new talent are sharing tips and submission instructions through their blogs.

Here is a blog I came across this morning from a suggestion on my Twitter page.

Navigating the Slush Pile.

An Interview with Caryn Wiseman

Here’s an interview with another agent who represents books for children. She is still with the Andrea Brown Literary Agency. Submission guidelines and recent deals are on the agency’s site.

Most Popular Posts 2010 – Caryn Wiseman – Andrea Brown Literary Agency – Tales from the Rushmore Kid.

I Left My Heart in Dimension X « John M Cusick

I just discovered a great new blog. It’s from literary agent John M. Cusick. He represents works for young people. I heard about him in an e-mail announcing a webinar he will be offering through Writer’s Digest.  It is about writing and selling science fiction and fantasy.

I wanted to find out more about him and plugged his name into Google. The post below caught my eye. It is about his encounter with Bruce Coville at the Rutgers On-on-One conference. I like him. : ). I am following his blog. You may want to follow it, too.

I Left My Heart in Dimension X « John M Cusick.