Lou Treleaven Interviews Stephanie Thwaites at Curtis Brown

Here’s an interview with an agent who represents books for children, Stephanie Thwaites at Curtis Brown.

Click on the link to find out more about her.

An interview with Stephanie Thwaites, children’s agent at Curtis Brown | Lou Treleaven, writer.

The Only Person Like Him in the Whole Wide World

Here’s an author who has built a career on his very unique background and his amazing special interest. (I discovered him on Twitter this morning.) What is your unique set of interests? How can you share it in your books?

Amazon.com: Teodor Flonta: Books, Biography, Blog, Audiobooks, Kindle.

Hone the Pitch for Your Picture Book

Read pitches by other children’s book writers, submit your own, or just follow along to learn more about the fine art of catching an agent’s eye. There is a contest too.

Susanna Leonard Hill: Would You Read It Wednesday #78 – Oakley’s Keys (PB) AND The Prize For The In Just Spring Contest!.

The Knight Agency, Inc. Represents Many Kinds of Books

Here’s another literary agency to consider. They have extensive resources on their site and represent a broad range of material.

Click on the link below to read their submissions policy.

Submission Guidelines :: The Knight Agency, Inc. — A Literary Agency.

Ratchet Up Your Writing by Studying Poetry

I have written poetry since I was a child, but I know that many authors have never explored the medium. It offers important lessons for any writer. Besides, it’s fun.

What Poetry Teaches Us about Writing Prose.

Fantasy Elements in Realistic Novels

I am writing a contemporary middle grade fantasy that includes many very realistic elements, including a real-world contemporary problem that is resolved in the end. The following blog post addresses a different sort of fantasy/reality mix.

Take a look at this inspiring and practical advice by clicking on the link below.

4 Techniques To Mix Fantasy With Realism.

The 2013 Chapter Book Challenge is in March

If you are working on a novel for children as I am, NaNo WriMo might not exactly fit your needs. This one is especially timely for me. I will be coming off a month of writing a picture book draft a day in February. (Okay, well, one a day sometimes and five in a day to catch up. Did I say they were good? Um, no, at least not at this point.)

March will be different. I want to finish a novel I have been working on for years and this challenge is perfect. Finishing it should just take a couple of weeks. I am very close. That will give me some time for edits I have marked. I know I shouldn’t do this, but I have been editing as I go, so when I finish at the end of March , I hope it will be ready to go. I plan to refine my pitch at an SCBWI regional mini-workshop. I am saying this now to commit myself to it.

If you want to finish or draft a book, click below. What do you have to lose? I have met some amazing people through these challenges.

Chapter Book Challenge: Line-up of authors, agents and publishers guest posting for 2013’s ChaBooCha.

The Importance of Voice in Picture Books

Voice is crucial in novels, but many people don’t realize that it is just as important in picture books. Here is a great introduction to voice. The rest of the blog is great too.

WRITING PICTURE BOOKS « George Shannon – Children’s Author.

Redefining Characters from Fairy Tales for Today’s Children

Find out about the place of archetypal  characters in contemporary stories for children in this brief, but informative post.

Simon Rose – Author Writer Presenter www.simon-rose.com: Magic in Stories for Children: Part Two – Characters from Fairy Tales.