The Stages of Storytelling

I love this site and the newsletter that comes with it. The posts offer practical advice and inspiration for writers of all levels.

The site promotes a couple of kinds of story development software, but you don’t need to buy either to enjoy the current posts and the archive.

Today’s post breaks writing down into four steps.

  1. Inspiration
  2. Development
  3. Exposition
  4. Storytelling

My current projects are on the fifth step–revision, but that involves looking back at the others to evaluate my original intention and to “see again” (re-vise) what the story has become.

Where are you in this process?

See Me Around the Internet

My contemporary acrylics on canvas

My Authors Guild Site

Art ideas for kids related to my book, Everyday Art for the Classroom Teacher

My handle on Instagram

Poetry Prompts and Samples Related to My Chapbook Early Tigers

My Writing Page on Facebook

My Stock Photo Portfolio on iStock

Life on Colorado’s Western Slope

Learning Ideas for Pre-K- Grade 1 Related to my Book ABC Follow Me

Join the Discussion, or Start One

Keep in Touch

Before the Hero’s Journey

This fantastic blog post provides insight into a journey of great interest to writers of middle grade and young adult fiction–the path to individuation, and even better, that path as it relates to women and girls.

The post refers to many classic and recent books for writers for further investigation. I’m bookmarking this one, and you might like to as well. Click on the link below to check it out.

Some Recent Posts on One Way to Wonder

Other Places to Find Me

My Art Portfolio

Especially for Poets

My Local Trips

Notes From a Virtual Easel

My Authors Guild Site

My Latest on Instagram

My Latest on Flickr

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Find More Articles for Writers on This Blog

Latest Comments

Revising for Structure

When I finish the dummy for my current picture book project, I’m going to dig back into my magical realism middle grade novel.

Here’s an amazing post that came in an e-newsletter today. It’s perfect and I know it will help me. If you’re revising your NaNoWriMo magnum opus, it might help you too.


How to Write a Chapter Book from an Expert

Interested in writing for children? Don’t miss this great post on literary agent Jill Corcoran’s blog. While you’re there, check out other useful information for writers. I have heard her speak at conferences. Writers who have her as an agent are very lucky. She is warm, honest, and experienced.

#WritingTips Raffle Editor Jen Arena’s Expert Advice on Writing Chapter Books Win a Copy of Jen’s 100 SNOWMEN.

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat

Galley Cat will be offering great tips for writing your novel every day this month. Check out the day’s post and the archive.

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat.

From The Write Practice Blog, Advice on Creating Good Bad Guys

The most important character in your story is the villain. If you find that your story is lacking something, you probably don’t have to look any further than the opposition. If your hero doesn’t have much to overcome, he can’t be much of a hero. The greater the evil he faces, the greater your protagonist will be. Even in stories of man against nature, it can’t just be any storm, it has to be the Perfect Storm. See what I mean? Click below for some great ways to make your opposition more effective–and more original.

50 Shades of Villain: How to Characterize Without Cliché.

About the Third Person Objective POV

Find out about the third person objective. It’s probably not a good choice if you are not writing a screenplay, but if you are curious about it, here’s a good introduction with suggestions for making it work.

re: What’s the Beef with Third Person Objective POV? | DearEditor.com.

Find Out Why Picture Book Manuscripts are Shorter Than They Used to Be

If you have checked market guidelines lately, you know picture book manuscripts are shorter than ever. Read the post below to find out why.

re: What’s Up with the Super Short Picture Book Texts? | DearEditor.com.

Storytelling Basics: Tragedy

Here’s another in a terrific series of posts summarizing basic plots on The Write Practice blog. For a quick review of the bottom line of storytelling, take an hour or so and review the basic plots covered on the site. It may save you years of learning the hard way.

The 7 Basic Plots: Tragedy.

What NOT to Include in Your First Pages

Here’s an article I’m going to be studying. You might want to take a look, too. It summarizes what sends up red flags for readers (agents or not).

Writer Unboxed » What NOT to Do When Beginning Your Novel: Advice from Literary Agents.