Funny Picture Books Need Golden Hearts

I love the Children’s Book Academy. I just finished a month-long workshop on writing picture books and learned so much. Some manuscripts I need to revise one more time are humorous and that is important, because everyone loves funny stories (especially me,) but the best humorous tales offer a deeper layer, like the finish on a fine wine.

Click on this link to read what it means to create a picture book with both humor and heart.

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A Panel of Writers Discusses How they Got Their Agents

I don’t know about you, but I’m currently looking for an agent. Here’s a podcast panel with five agented writers talking about how they connected with those all-important partners in the publishing business.

Click here to check it out.

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Advice about Naming Characters

Think of your favorite story people. Their names are as familiar as those of your best friends. In real life most of us don’t bother to adjust our names to our personalities, so sometimes they don’t quite fit.

As writers, though, we can take advantage of subconscious biases to help readers love or hate story people.

Here’s an interesting article from the Pikes Peak Writers newsletter about character names. I love this organization and have attended many of their excellent conventions. The one this year is virtual and signup will begin soon.

Click on the link below for the article What’s in a Name?

or visit one of my other recent posts for writers.

I’ve been finding great articles for quite a while. Looking for something special? Try the tag cloud.

I’m a painter and photographer too. Visit my art blog “Thinking in Pictures.”

https://wordpress.com/posts/lindajarmstrong.wordpress.com

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and here’s my account at Flickr. There are abstract photos and also some cool pics my Dad took when he was in Alaska in World War II.

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Have a Picture Book MS? Check This Out

Click on the link for information about how to create a winning entry for PB Pitch sessions on Twitter.


More resources for picture book writers and more about me.

https://www.instagram.com/thisbluerabbit/

A Selection of Websites for Writers

The Write Life is a good site go get to know. It includes many excellent resources for writers. Here’s their 2020 list of websites. When you have time, cruise around and see which ones fit your needs.

https://thewritelife.com/best-websites-for-writers-2020/

Photo by Bich Tran on Pexels.com

How to Write a Chapter Book from an Expert

Interested in writing for children? Don’t miss this great post on literary agent Jill Corcoran’s blog. While you’re there, check out other useful information for writers. I have heard her speak at conferences. Writers who have her as an agent are very lucky. She is warm, honest, and experienced.

#WritingTips Raffle Editor Jen Arena’s Expert Advice on Writing Chapter Books Win a Copy of Jen’s 100 SNOWMEN.

An Agent Critiques First Pages

An Agent Critiques First Pages

You only have a few paragraphs to capture a reader, whether a buyer on a site or in a bookstore, or a publishing professional. In this great post from Kathy Temean, agent ¬†Sean McCarthy critiques first page submissions from three different children’s book authors.

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat

Galley Cat will be offering great tips for writing your novel every day this month. Check out the day’s post and the archive.

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat.

From The Write Practice Blog, Advice on Creating Good Bad Guys

The most important character in your story is the villain. If you find that your story is lacking something, you probably don’t have to look any further than the opposition. If your hero doesn’t have much to overcome, he can’t be much of a hero. The greater the evil he faces, the greater your protagonist will be. Even in stories of man against nature, it can’t just be any storm, it has to be the Perfect Storm. See what I mean? Click below for some great ways to make your opposition more effective–and more original.

50 Shades of Villain: How to Characterize Without Cliché.