Advice about Naming Characters

Think of your favorite story people. Their names are as familiar as those of your best friends. In real life most of us don’t bother to adjust our names to our personalities, so sometimes they don’t quite fit.

As writers, though, we can take advantage of subconscious biases to help readers love or hate story people.

Here’s an interesting article from the Pikes Peak Writers newsletter about character names. I love this organization and have attended many of their excellent conventions. The one this year is virtual and signup will begin soon.

Click on the link below for the article What’s in a Name?

or visit one of my other recent posts for writers.

I’ve been finding great articles for quite a while. Looking for something special? Try the tag cloud.

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NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat

Galley Cat will be offering great tips for writing your novel every day this month. Check out the day’s post and the archive.

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat.

Create Conflict with Action

Make your character commit to action. Read why this is important and how to do it in Kristen Lamb’s blog.

Would You Rather? An Exercise in Creating Max Conflict in Fiction | Kristen Lamb’s Blog.

There Can Be Only One…Main Character, That Is

About main characters. Screenwriters know about story structure. It is a good idea to listen to them about this. Of course, there are always exceptions, but if you think your book has more than one main character, this post is worth reading.

Let’s Schmooze – Doug Eboch on Screenwriting: There Can Be Only One…Main Character, That Is.

How to Use Ideas from Real Life in Stories

Use real life to inspire your stories. Here’s a great post about how to do that.

Turning Your Anecdote into a Short Story: Part 1 | WritingCompanion.

What’s in a Name? Everything!

The heart of a great story is a great character. A rose may be a rose may be a rose, but a character’s name is very important. Consider how much Harry’s name tells us about young Potter. Here’s a handy guide for naming characters.

How to Name Your Characters.

From Editor and Author Cheryl Klein: A Plot Checklist for Revision

I’m putting together materials for our local SCBWI group’s April Revision Workshop. One of my favorite revision gurus is Cheryl Klein. If you don’t already have it, pick up a copy of Second Sight: An Editor’s Talks on Writing, Revising, & Publishing Books for Children and Young Adults. Until it arrives, or even if you already have it, download this helpful plot checklist. The site even has a Word template!

CherylKlein.com » Plot Checklist.

Oops! There’s Nothing Wrong with Your Character

I am sharing this here because I want to be able to find it again myself. It is a great chart of facinating flaws for story people.

123 Ideas for Character Flaws – Writers Write.

The Importance of Voice in Picture Books

Voice is crucial in novels, but many people don’t realize that it is just as important in picture books. Here is a great introduction to voice. The rest of the blog is great too.

WRITING PICTURE BOOKS « George Shannon – Children’s Author.