The Stages of Storytelling

I love this site and the newsletter that comes with it. The posts offer practical advice and inspiration for writers of all levels.

The site promotes a couple of kinds of story development software, but you don’t need to buy either to enjoy the current posts and the archive.

Today’s post breaks writing down into four steps.

  1. Inspiration
  2. Development
  3. Exposition
  4. Storytelling

My current projects are on the fifth step–revision, but that involves looking back at the others to evaluate my original intention and to “see again” (re-vise) what the story has become.

Where are you in this process?

See Me Around the Internet

My contemporary acrylics on canvas

My Authors Guild Site

Art ideas for kids related to my book, Everyday Art for the Classroom Teacher

My handle on Instagram

Poetry Prompts and Samples Related to My Chapbook Early Tigers

My Writing Page on Facebook

My Stock Photo Portfolio on iStock

Life on Colorado’s Western Slope

Learning Ideas for Pre-K- Grade 1 Related to my Book ABC Follow Me

Join the Discussion, or Start One

Keep in Touch

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat

Galley Cat will be offering great tips for writing your novel every day this month. Check out the day’s post and the archive.

NaNoWriMo Tip #3: Create a Character Outline – GalleyCat.

About the Third Person Objective POV

Find out about the third person objective. It’s probably not a good choice if you are not writing a screenplay, but if you are curious about it, here’s a good introduction with suggestions for making it work.

re: What’s the Beef with Third Person Objective POV? | DearEditor.com.

How Not to Begin a Novel

Those first pages make all the difference. If you do not capture an agent’s, editor’s, or reader’s attention from the beginning, those eyes will move on to another story. In this post, literary agents tell us what not to include.

Writer Unboxed » What NOT to Do When Beginning Your Novel: Advice from Literary Agents.

7 Deadly Sins of Prologues–Great Novel Beginnings Part 2 | Kristen Lamb’s Blog

If you have started your book with a prologue, here is something you should read from Kristen Lamb. Her entire blog, by the way, is fantastic!

7 Deadly Sins of Prologues–Great Novel Beginnings Part 2 | Kristen Lamb’s Blog.

Day 10, Donna L. Sadd’s Prompt: Write a Poem About Heart

By Jerry “Woody” from Edmonton, Canada [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
Today’s prompt on Donna Sadd’s blog is to write a poem about heart. Here’s mine:

The token

in my story

was going to be

a golden heart,

until I heard

every book

crossing the desk

centered on

that symbol

of life and love,

so I decided

to move a beat

further into

another constant

of life: change.

Sidekicks: Why Stories Need Them

If you think about your favorite stories. you will probably notice that the hero or heroine has friends. Where would Don Quixote have been without Sancho Panza, or Dorothy without her three adorable companions? Here’s a great article about sidekicks .

How to Kick Your Story Up a Notch With a Sidekick.

Put Forth Your Very Best: Revise

Thoughts on revision. You are not alone. It is depressing. It is, however, (in most cases) what separates authors from hobby scribblers. By the way, this is an excellent blog for YA writers.

WOW Wednesday: S.T. Underdahl on Revising When Your Head and Your Heart Agree.

YA Debut Author Anne Blankman’s Route to Publication

How do you get published? The answer is different for every writer. Here’s one author’s story. Your route will not be the same, but you will pick up some valuable information about the road. Don’t forget to check out other interviews in this excellent blog’s archive.

Writer, Writer, Pants on Fire: An SAT with YA Debut Author Anne Blankman.