Before the Hero’s Journey

This fantastic blog post provides insight into a journey of great interest to writers of middle grade and young adult fiction–the path to individuation, and even better, that path as it relates to women and girls.

The post refers to many classic and recent books for writers for further investigation. I’m bookmarking this one, and you might like to as well. Click on the link below to check it out.

Some Recent Posts on One Way to Wonder

Other Places to Find Me

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Especially for Poets

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Revising for Structure

When I finish the dummy for my current picture book project, I’m going to dig back into my magical realism middle grade novel.

Here’s an amazing post that came in an e-newsletter today. It’s perfect and I know it will help me. If you’re revising your NaNoWriMo magnum opus, it might help you too.


What NOT to Include in Your First Pages

Here’s an article I’m going to be studying. You might want to take a look, too. It summarizes what sends up red flags for readers (agents or not).

Writer Unboxed » What NOT to Do When Beginning Your Novel: Advice from Literary Agents.

Prologue in Fiction | The Editor’s Blog

From an editor, here’s a well-thought-out post on the pros and cons of prologues from a contemporary point of view. It starts with the pros. which, if you have used one, you already know. Keep reading. You may need yours, but you do need to know why they are less common in contemporary fiction than in works written 30, 40, 0r 50 years ago.

Prologue in Fiction | The Editor’s Blog.

Insights on Revision from Successful Authors

If you are revising a book, don’t miss this series of author interviews.

Revision Week: Matthew J. Kirby | DearEditor.com.

From Cheryl B. Klein: Fascinating Observations About Writing Powerful Fiction

Check out these fascinating answers to uncommon, but vital questions about writing fiction.

Brooklyn Arden: Nine Questions and Answers About Writing.

From Editor and Author Cheryl Klein: A Plot Checklist for Revision

I’m putting together materials for our local SCBWI group’s April Revision Workshop. One of my favorite revision gurus is Cheryl Klein. If you don’t already have it, pick up a copy of Second Sight: An Editor’s Talks on Writing, Revising, & Publishing Books for Children and Young Adults. Until it arrives, or even if you already have it, download this helpful plot checklist. The site even has a Word template!

CherylKlein.com » Plot Checklist.

From Author Holly Lisle: A Step-by-Step Guide to Novel Revision

Here’s a terrific post about how to revise a novel. Bookmark it or print it out!

One-Pass Manuscript Revision: From First Draft to Last in One Cycle | Holly Lisle: Official Author Homepage.

Write a Funny Book for Kids and Get an Agent

Here’s a great opportunity for writers of humorous children’s books.

John M. Cusick


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Hey gang, check it out. The Greenhouse Funny Prize is back. And guess what: this year, it’s open to North American writers!

Last year’s competition saw over 700 entries, and Pip Jones was our winner. Julia Churchill quickly sold Pip’s book, SQUISHY McFLUFF, THE INVISIBLE CAT, to Faber Children’s Books in a 4 book pre-empt.

So we’re putting out a call for funny stuff, from quirky picture books to wry y.a. The winner will receive an offer of representation from Greenhouse.

Wait, what?

That’s right. The winner gets rep’d people. Not bad.

Entry guidelines:

The Greenhouse Funny prize is open to un-agented writers writing funny fiction for children of all ages.

To get a good sense of the voice and where the character is headed, we’d like to see the first 5,000 words PLUS a short description (a few lines) of the book AND a one page outline that…

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The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test

Here are some resources for participants in this year’s NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) challenge. Generate an idea if you don’t have one, or check your idea if you do.

The Universal Mary Sue Litmus Test.