Storytelling Basics: Tragedy

Here’s another in a terrific series of posts summarizing basic plots on The Write Practice blog. For a quick review of the bottom line of storytelling, take an hour or so and review the basic plots covered on the site. It may save you years of learning the hard way.

The 7 Basic Plots: Tragedy.

Create Conflict with Action

Make your character commit to action. Read why this is important and how to do it in Kristen Lamb’s blog.

Would You Rather? An Exercise in Creating Max Conflict in Fiction | Kristen Lamb’s Blog.

Voyage and Return: A Classic Plot

The vogage and return is a very common storytelling structure. It fits classic epic poems as well as children’s fiction. In my case, both this month’s picture book for Julie Hedlund’s 12 x 12 book and a MG fantasy novel in progress for 5 years and counting follow this format.

Click on the link below for a great overview.

The 7 Basic Plots: Voyage and Return.

One Writer’s Experience at the 2013 Pikes Peak Writers Conference

Yesterday, I returned from the Pikes Peak Writers Conference. As usual it was an amazing experience. Here are some things I took away:

1. I heard top agent Barry Goldblatt critique first pages read by attendees. Now, I have a much better idea where to start my story. I had way too much dialogue up front. Not enough was happening. I need to start at a more dramatic moment. Actually, that’s easy. I just need to skip more pages.

2. The night before the conference started, my roomie, an amazing writer, had reviewed my own first page and synopsis. Together, we pinpointed the organizing principle of my protagonist’s personality. I now can see the thread stringing the pearls of my plot together. It was always there, but not as clear to me as it was to her. That help was priceless. (You know who you are–thank you!)

3. I spent some time with other writers and an agent chatting in Zebulon’s Library, an intimate bookless conference room near the restaurant. It was a different and relaxing way to meet people and share information.

4. I met an energetic, fascinating, famous, and powerful professional writer in the bar. Her example was a gift. Most immediately applicable of the many things I learned from her is a working method. She uses a bluetooth microphone and paces around her office, dictating, during working hours. She logs 4000 words a day. Okay, I ordered a bluetooth microphone this morning. Reviewers say it works with Dragon Naturally Speaking, which I like and have trained. This week I have assignments to turn in and errands to catch up on, but this weekend, I am going to finish my novel, or at the very least, come close. I am one of those strange people who finds it much easier to rewrite than to do the initial draft, so this is going to work. It will also help my sciatica (caused, in my case, by too much sitting) heal and increase my calorie burn.

5. I heard an accomplished thriller writer discuss his Stanislovski-style method of characterization. I couldn’t do it the way he does. (He actually shoplifted once  as part of his character research.) I can, however, use my imagination to immerse myself more deeply into my protagonist’s mind. He emphasized the characters’ feelings, but, more than that, the responses of other people to the way a given character acts. Coming home, I found myself observing people in the airport more closely.

6. I heard a professional nonfiction writer, an architect, giving advice about how to break into writing. I have been broken in for quite some time, but his talk reminded me of avenues to publication I have not explored in a while, and I will be watching them more carefully in the coming months, making notes for possible projects.

7. I attended two panels where literary agents answered questions commonly posed by attendees. I was able to see people who represent the kind of book I am writing. When I am ready to submit, I will be able to associate their names, faces, and personalities with information I find online.  I will also be able to say what impressed me about them. (One of my major goals this year is finding appropriate representation for my work.) By the way, don’t be discouraged if you get rejections from agents. They get more than 1000 queries a week and ask for few sample pages (even fewer full manuscripts).

8. I heard a famous thriller writer extol the virtues of self-publishing (though Amazon). It’s not for me, but, hey.

9. I added to my list of books to read.

10. I met many wonderful fellow-writers, ate great food, took a walk in the Garden of the Gods, sipped Blue Moon, had a massage, and watched Eat, Pray, Love on Saturday night in our room. (Husbands will not share that one.) What could be better?

Writing from the Peak: Rocking the 2013 Pikes Peak Writers Conference.

There Can Be Only One…Main Character, That Is

About main characters. Screenwriters know about story structure. It is a good idea to listen to them about this. Of course, there are always exceptions, but if you think your book has more than one main character, this post is worth reading.

Let’s Schmooze – Doug Eboch on Screenwriting: There Can Be Only One…Main Character, That Is.

7 Continuation Issues To Avoid When Writing a Series

If you are writing the second book in a series, can you depend on readers knowing everything from the first book? Would be nice, wouldn’t it? But, uh, no. And that’s not all.

Writing A Series: 7 Continuation Issues To Avoid | The Creative Penn.

The Same But Different: Writing For Children’s Series | SCBWI Metro NY News

Challenges of writing the second book in a series.

The Same But Different: Writing For Children’s Series | SCBWI Metro NY News.

Sidekicks: Why Stories Need Them

If you think about your favorite stories. you will probably notice that the hero or heroine has friends. Where would Don Quixote have been without Sancho Panza, or Dorothy without her three adorable companions? Here’s a great article about sidekicks .

How to Kick Your Story Up a Notch With a Sidekick.

How to Use Ideas from Real Life in Stories

Use real life to inspire your stories. Here’s a great post about how to do that.

Turning Your Anecdote into a Short Story: Part 1 | WritingCompanion.