A Shaky Reading

On Sunday afternoon I went to a poetry reading. When I stood up to do my thing, Both my voice and knees began to shake.

What was going on? I performed as a storyteller every day in the school library for seven years. Then I remembered. That was thirty years, almost a lifetime, ago.

We all live so many lives. (I know if I walked up to my younger self, I’d scare the pants off her.)

The poem I botched on Sunday was from a sequence of dramatic monologues I wrote when we were living in the Highland Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. (Yes, LA does have distinct neighborhoods. I’ll tell you more about them another time.)

I composed the piece in the late eighties or early nineties for a group of actors who teamed up with the Arroyo Arts Collective to do cold readings of local authors’ poems, short stories, and novel excerpts. The title was “The Marriage Bed.”

Mostly invented, the sequence drew on things that happened even earlier in my life, in the mid-sixties.

I was nineteen. I’d just run away and married my husband, a guy I’d dated a month.

On our first morning together the phone rang. One of my husband’s friends, Jim Ashley, lived in Ouray, a tiny nineteenth-century mining town in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. He worked for the Idorado Mine, the village’s economic engine.

The afternoon before, Jim had stepped on a rotten board just inside the mine entrance and plummeted down through a dark vertical tunnel all the way from the Red Mountain entrance to the Telluride entrance, hundreds of feet.

I didn’t know Jim, but that secondhand experience drilled itself into my mind. Every so often I fall into it, just as I did on Sunday.

There was one more layer to my shaky reading. After its first, last, and only cold performance by the Arroyo Arts Collective players, “The Marriage Bed” disappeared into my files. I made a few half-hearted attempts to send it out, but knew it was destined to be one of those things I did just for myself. (There are a LOT of those.)

Then I saw a call for an anthology in Coda (which later became Poets and Writers.) It was for ghost poems. The voice in one of the monologues in The Marriage Bed, “Frank,” was a ghost, the long-dead father of the husband in the story.   I sent it.

It was accepted. I’d forgotten about the book, Ghost of a Chance,  until Sunday. Looking at it, I was amazed. There I was, hired-gun ed writer, with Rita Dove, Billy Collins, and others famous for their poetry.

Then I remembered, huddling in the back seat of my dad’s ’41 Chevy, playing with the sounds of words. I must have been two or three.

We live so many lives. So many layered lives. Sharing them with others can be a shaky experience, but we only have the stage for a few minutes, so why not?

 

 

 

YA Debut Author Anne Blankman’s Route to Publication

How do you get published? The answer is different for every writer. Here’s one author’s story. Your route will not be the same, but you will pick up some valuable information about the road. Don’t forget to check out other interviews in this excellent blog’s archive.

Writer, Writer, Pants on Fire: An SAT with YA Debut Author Anne Blankman.

Submit Work to an Anthology

Calls for anthology submissions. Sort through your short stories, children’s stories, and poetry. Then, mark your calendars. It is one way to catch the eye of an editor or agent.

Anthologies: Call for Submissions | Anthology Collections | Themes | Publish in Anthology.

How to Write a Great Query Letter

Don’t miss this complete guide to writing an effective query letter.

I’m saving it for the day I finish the rewrite on my book.

Now, I’m going downstairs to make dinner.

Anatomy Of A Query Letter: A Step-By-Step Guide.

On the Hunt for a Literary Agent? Check Out Agent Obvious

Here’s another great resource for authors seeking an agent. It from a former editor, now a literary agent Laurie Abkemeier.

AGENT OBVIOUS.

Falling Leaflets: What Agents Say About National Novel Writing Month

Here’s a useful article with advice from agents about what to do after you finish your NaNoWriMo novel.

Falling Leaflets: What Agents Say About National Novel Writing Month.

11 NaNoWriMo Books That Have Been Published – Mental Floss

Need inspiration? Find out about some NaNoWriMo books that have been published!

11 NaNoWriMo Books That Have Been Published – Mental Floss.

The Changing Role of Publishers in the Digital Age

Publishing is changing. It is much easier and less expensive now for an author to reach out to the audience directly. The problem is that it is easy for everyone to do this.

If you have a website, you know that enticing people to view it can be a problem when millions of other sites clamor for attention. The same is true now for “books.” I put the term in quotation marks because so many publications are just as virtual as sites.

Here’s a well-thought-out essay about the situation from an industry professional. If you are thinking about publishing your work, it’s worth a read.

The Future of the Author-Publisher Relationship – Jane Friedman.

Advanced Fiction Writing Blog » Blog Archive » How Do You Make A Living As A Novelist?

If you’ve been looking everywhere for the secret path to professional publication, today’s your lucky day, because here it is. Read this article and follow its recommendation. That’s it.

Advanced Fiction Writing Blog » Blog Archive » How Do You Make A Living As A Novelist?.