Revising for Structure

When I finish the dummy for my current picture book project, I’m going to dig back into my magical realism middle grade novel.

Here’s an amazing post that came in an e-newsletter today. It’s perfect and I know it will help me. If you’re revising your NaNoWriMo magnum opus, it might help you too.


How to Write a Chapter Book from an Expert

Interested in writing for children? Don’t miss this great post on literary agent Jill Corcoran’s blog. While you’re there, check out other useful information for writers. I have heard her speak at conferences. Writers who have her as an agent are very lucky. She is warm, honest, and experienced.

#WritingTips Raffle Editor Jen Arena’s Expert Advice on Writing Chapter Books Win a Copy of Jen’s 100 SNOWMEN.

How to Structure a Picture Book

How to Structure a Picture Book

Even if you have not signed up for Julie Hedlund’s fantastic 12 x 12 (Twelve picture book manuscripts in twelve months) program, you can benefit from her line-up of featured authors, editors, and agents. First up this year, author and consultant Emma Walton Hamilton offers a super mini-course in picture book construction. If you have a manuscript, or just an idea, take a few minutes to read it. You won’t be sorry.

Storytelling Basics: Tragedy

Here’s another in a terrific series of posts summarizing basic plots on The Write Practice blog. For a quick review of the bottom line of storytelling, take an hour or so and review the basic plots covered on the site. It may save you years of learning the hard way.

The 7 Basic Plots: Tragedy.

Voyage and Return: A Classic Plot

The vogage and return is a very common storytelling structure. It fits classic epic poems as well as children’s fiction. In my case, both this month’s picture book for Julie Hedlund’s 12 x 12 book and a MG fantasy novel in progress for 5 years and counting follow this format.

Click on the link below for a great overview.

The 7 Basic Plots: Voyage and Return.

There Can Be Only One…Main Character, That Is

About main characters. Screenwriters know about story structure. It is a good idea to listen to them about this. Of course, there are always exceptions, but if you think your book has more than one main character, this post is worth reading.

Let’s Schmooze – Doug Eboch on Screenwriting: There Can Be Only One…Main Character, That Is.

7 Deadly Sins of Prologues–Great Novel Beginnings Part 2 | Kristen Lamb’s Blog

If you have started your book with a prologue, here is something you should read from Kristen Lamb. Her entire blog, by the way, is fantastic!

7 Deadly Sins of Prologues–Great Novel Beginnings Part 2 | Kristen Lamb’s Blog.

Prologue in Fiction | The Editor’s Blog

From an editor, here’s a well-thought-out post on the pros and cons of prologues from a contemporary point of view. It starts with the pros. which, if you have used one, you already know. Keep reading. You may need yours, but you do need to know why they are less common in contemporary fiction than in works written 30, 40, 0r 50 years ago.

Prologue in Fiction | The Editor’s Blog.

One Industry Professional’s Take on Prologues

Good sense about prologues from author and former agent Nathan Bransford.

Prologues | Nathan Bransford, Author.

On Prologues

Here’s a great blog post about prologues in novels. It provides an interesting and balanced view.

When I was a kid I skipped prologues. I wanted to get to the story. (I still do.) All readers are different, though. Some people love them.

Where to Begin? When, Where and How to Write a Prologue.